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MART

museo di arte moderna
e contemporanea
di trento e rovereto

  • Francisco Infante-Arana - Artefatti, dalla serie «Impressioni agresti-95», 1995 - Rovereto, Mart - Fondo Sandretti del ‘900 russo
  • Alėna (Elena Valentinovna) Kircova - Gradini. Dal ciclo «Viaggio», 1990 - Rovereto, Mart - Fondo Sandretti del ‘900 russo
  • Julij Jul’evič Perevezencev - Natura morta con treni, 1965 - Rovereto, Mart - Fondo Sandretti del ‘900 russo
  • Boris Petrovič Svešnikov - [Finestra], metą anni Sessanta - Rovereto, Mart - Fondo Sandretti del ‘900 russo
  • Julo Ilmar Jochann Sooster - [Orsi], s.d. - Rovereto, Mart - Fondo Sandretti del ‘900 russo
  • Sergej Anatolevič Bugaev (Afrika) - Senza titolo, 1991 - Rovereto, Mart - Fondo Sandretti del ‘900 russo

ART AGAINST
Research in Russian art since 1950
Works from the Sandretti collection of 20th-century Russian art

 
Mart ROvereto
13 October 2007 / 20 January 2008
The exhibition presents a selection of about 180 works of russian art, produced by artists who are not very well-known to the general public. Their work met with the ostracism of the official culture of the time, which sought to suppress creative freedom, and indeed, many of these artists led dramatic lives.
 
B

ack in the 1950s, an Italian with a great passion for Russia began collecting the art of painters who ran counter to the dictates of socialist realism. Since then, Alberto Sandretti has never stopped and today his rich collection, whose contemporary Russian art section alone counts more than 1500 works, is housed at the Mart. The presence of this interesting collection in the Museum has suggested new areas of research, in particular as regards the study of cultural relations between Italy and Russia during the 20th century.
The ART AGAINST. Research in Russian art since 1950 exhibition is the result of two years of study and cataloguing of the Collection.
 

 

The exhibition revolves around an important nucleus of so-called non-conformist works of art, all produced from the late 1950s onwards.
These were years in which, coinciding with a brief thaw in the internal political scene in the USSR, a wide-ranging group of painters and sculptors sought an artistic language free of the regime’s dogma. Borrowing from the heritage handed down by the Russian avant-garde, but also from Western experiences, artists such as Boris Svesnikov, Vladimir Nemuchin, Oskar Rabin and Ulo Sooster, were able to express a personal creative autonomy.
 

Curator: Alexandra Obukhova
Technical curator and catalogue editor: Elisabetta Barisoni